Breastfeeding can protect an immature baby from urinary tract infections, Dr. Itzhak Levy and his colleagues found.

They performed a case controlled study that was conducted in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit between 1995 and 2003. Their study group included all premature infants less than 37 weeks gestation diagnosed with a urinary tract infection.

It was found that the main organism present was a klebsiella species. Baby boys were found to be more prone to urinary infections.

Breastfeeding  was associated with a lower risk of infection with a 95% confidence interval. Doctors explain that maternal immunoglobulins passed through breast milk must have a protective effect.

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If you needed yet another reason to breastfeed, here you go: apparently, breastfeeding enhances baby’s emotional and intellectual development.

Scientists found that children who are breastfed are less likely to suffer from behavioral or mental health issues than those who are not breastfed.

Using 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health data, researchers found that parents of breastfed children were less likely to report concern for the child’s behavior.

Breastfed children were less likely to have been diagnosed by a health professional with behavioral  problems and were less likely to have received mental health care.

Additionally, parents of breastfed children were less likely to report concern about the child’s ability to learn.

“These findings support current evidence that breastfeeding enhances childhood intellectual ability and… protects against psychiatric illness and behavioral problems,” said Katherine Hobbs Knutson, MD, lead researcher on the study.

The study was presented at the American Public Health Association’s 136th Annual Meeting & Exposition in San Diego.

Children who are breastfed are less likely to suffer from behavioral or mental health issues than those who are not breastfed, according to new research.

The study, which was presented at the American Public Health Association’s 136th Annual Meeting & Exposition in San Diego, looked at whether breastfeeding is associated with decreased behavioral problems and psychiatric illness during childhood.

Parents of breastfed children were less likely to report concern for the child’s behavior, it appears.

Breastfed children were less likely to have been diagnosed by a health professional with behavioral or conduct problems and were less likely to have received mental health care.

Additionally, parents of breastfed children were less likely to report concern about the child’s ability to learn.

“These findings support current evidence that breastfeeding enhances childhood intellectual ability while providing new evidence that breastfeeding may contribute to childhood emotional development and protect against psychiatric illness and behavioral problems,” said Katherine Hobbs Knutson, MD, lead researcher on the study.

The study used 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health data from 102,353 interviews of parents and guardians on the health of their children.

Baby drinking formula milk

Baby drinking formula milk

China said nearly 13,000 children were in hospital Sunday after drinking toxic formula milk .

 Chinese health ministry said 12,892 infants were in hospital with 104 babies in serious condition, as reported by country’s official Xinhua news agency.

Some 1,579 babies had been “cured” and discharged, the government said, adding that hospitals nationwide admitted almost 40,000 children. 

Should we believe these reports about miraculous “cures”? After all, China is well-known for its strict governmental control over media reports, and the country also known for its swift moves in anything that questions its status in the world.

If it can miraculously doctor child gymnasts’ passports so they could participate in Olympics, it can also “doctor” those poor, sick babies who drank what?

Baby formula with melamine.

The practice of adding industrial chemical melamine, normally used to make plastics, to watered-down milk to boost apparent protein levels, is quite common in China.

Melamine, which causes urinary problems including kidney stones, was first discovered in baby formula and then in liquid milk, yoghurt and ice-cream, leading to mass recalls.

At least four children have died from drinking poisonous baby formula.

Some Chinese media reports have said the melamine baby formula scam had been going on in China for years, with the Communist country’s corrupt food safety system that could not prevent use of toxic chemicals in baby toys or food.

Let’s not forget where the baby toys contaminated with lead came from. That’s right – China!

Last year, melamine was found in exports of Chinese pet food which killed cats and dogs in the United States.

As the World Health Organization questioned Beijing’s handling of the crisis,a Hong Kong toddler also became the first child affected outside the mainland. A three-year-old girl developed a kidney stone after drinking Chinese milk powder but she has left hospital and is in good condition.

Meanwhile, more countries moved to bar Chinese milk products.

“It seems people already knew of this problem for some time and did not share this information,” Shigeru Omi, Western Pacific director of the UN’s World Health Organization, said on Sunday.

“What we want to do now is prevent this happening again, not just with milk products, but with all foods,” he said.

Food? Oh my. This is scary. How many thousands of people WORLDWIDE are eating melamine-contaminated Chinese dim sum, spring rolls, or takeaway RIGHT NOW?

 I guess I will never eat Chinese food ever again, unless it comes from reputable sources (do they actually exist?) or if I cook it myself from organic or at least local products with ZERO ingredients from China.

Sorry, but I think it’s just not worth it.

INFO SOURCE: Agence France Presse.

Protective effects of breast milk are higher in girls than in boys, found Johns Hopkins Children’s Center investigators.

Challenging the long-standing belief that breast-feeding equally protects all babies against disease, research suggests that when it comes to respiratory infections, the protective effects of breast milk are higher in girls than in boys.

Following 119 premature babies in Buenos Aires through their first year of life, researchers found that breast-feeding not only offered more protection to girls than boys, but also that formula-fed girls had the highest risk for severe respiratory infections.

The findings, reported in the June issue of Pediatrics, cast doubt on the theory that immune system chemicals contained in breast milk and passed directly from mother to newborn are responsible for preventing the infections. If this were the case, researchers say, both boys and girls would likely derive equal protection.

In addition, breast-feeding did not appear to affect the number of infections, but rather their severity and the need for hospitalization, meaning that breast milk does not prevent a baby from getting an infection, but helps a baby cope with an infection better.

“In light of these results, we are starting to think that milk does not directly transfer protection against lung infections but instead switches on a universal protective mechanism, already in the baby, that is for some reason easier to turn on in girls than in boys,” says senior investigator Fernando Polack, M.D., an infectious disease specialist at Hopkins Children’s.

Shortly after birth, formula-fed girls were eight times more likely than breast-fed girls to develop serious respiratory infections requiring hospitalization, the study results showed. Formula-fed girls were also more likely to develop such infections than both breast-fed and non-breast-fed boys.

“When resources are limited, it helps to know that your high-risk group is formula-fed girls,” Polack says. The findings also suggest that the mothers of premature girls should be strongly encouraged to breast-feed, investigators say.